Month: September 2015

Journal

BOW: post from the field #2: September 21, 2015

| from Calgary looking ahead to the Calgary performances

 

The Bow River runs right by Wojciech and Melissa Monteros’ home, where we three Body of Water artists are living and working together for the second week of the Calgary portion of the project. The rhythm of our workdays are determined by the weather, the perpetually shifting river, and the working schedule of the dedicated and inspiring young dancers of W&M Physical Theatre’s Surge Company. Only a few days into their season, these dancers bravely leapt into our collaboration, and into site-specific dance practices.

 

The other day, I waded into the river to photograph the Surge company dancing: their heads in the water, bare feet resting on the pebbles and stones, a line of still bodies drawn on the shore; an image complicated by the troubles of our world and all its’ current struggles and inequities. I noted the intense power of the dancing body (simply, eloquently, wordlessly) casting perspective for the incidental audience gathering on the bridge above us. By placing themselves in a vulnerable position, the dancers became incredibly strong. I am grateful to the Surge guest artists’ willingness to work with us on this creative process. It is a gift to us older artists to collaborate with young artists, and witness their bright light illuminating paths we may have danced before.

 

— ADR

 

 

Journal

BOW: post from the field # 1: September 17,…

| from Calgary looking back to the process in Whitehorse

BOW: post from the field # 1: September 17, 2015

| from Calgary looking back to the process in Whitehorse

During a break in the rain, we drove to Long Lake in Whitehorse. We took with us the clothes and shoes and the 6-foot standard folding table around which we had constellated for a few days in the Old Fire Hall. We imagined filming a sequence on the shore of the Lake — enacting a scene of bureaucrats around a table who are in conflict with, and ineffective to protect or relate to, the wild space surrounding them — the illusion of human control maintained by sedentary paperwork, to the detriment of water and all Nature.

Instead, shortly after carrying the table down the hill to the shore, Anne and I waded it into the water, pushed the table legs into the silt, yelling and laughing from the impact of the cold water. With the immersed table, we created the brief illusion of standing (dancing, sitting, crawling) almost on the surface of the water. For the Body of Water performance in Whitehorse on Friday September 4th 2015, we immersed three tables this way, end to end with enough space to wade between them. The cold water gushed off our heavy black clothing when we stood up. The shoes may still be wet. 

[if !supportEmptyParas] 

— ADR